This site is intended for healthcare professionals only

Scabies, in images

Written by: | Published:

The scabies mite

Scabies is caused by the parasitic mite Sarcoptes scabiei, which is reliant on humans to complete its life cycle. These eight legged, straw coloured mites measure 0.2-0.4mm in length, but the female is slightly larger than the male. After mating, the male dies and the female seeks a host. It burrows into the human stratum corneum of the epidermis., lays two to three eggs each day, and feeds off the skin and tissue fluids produced by the excavations. The eggs hatch two days later and, as the larvae develop, they make their way to the surface of the skin, feeding on fluids secreted from the hair follicles. The life cycle is complete two weeks later, when the larvae have moulted twice. The newly moulted mites create a small burrow before mating. As the eggs hatch, the number of mites rapidly increases but a high percentage will die. Mites can survive up to a month when hosted by the human but for only three days when away from their host.

Presentation


Please login or register to read the rest of the article and to have access to downloads and comments.


What do you think? Leave a comment below or tweet your views to @IndyNurseMag

This material is protected by MA Healthcare Ltd copyright.
See Terms and Conditions.

Newsletter

Sign up to the newsletter

About

Independent Nurse is the professional resource for primary care and community nurses, providing clinical articles for practice nurses and prescribers.

Newsletter

Subscribe to our newsletter and stay up to date with the latest nursing news.

Stay Connected

Stay social with Independent Nurse by following us on Twitter, liking us on Facebook or connecting on LinkedIn.

Archive

Need access to some of our older articles? You can view our archive, or alternatively contact us.

Contact Us

MA Healthcare Ltd.
St Jude's Church, Dulwich Road
London, SE24 0PB

Tel: +44 (0)20 7738 5454
Registered in England and Wales No. 01878373

Meet the team

Authors

Find out how to contribute to Independent Nurse here.