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Government approves 1% pay rise for nurses

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Nurses will receive a 1% pay rise A 1% pay rise is encouraging but not enough for nurses say unions

The government has accepted the Pay Review Body's recommendation to increase NHS staff pay by 1%.

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt wrote to the body to accept all of the recommendations in full, which includes a 1% pay rise for all NHS staff on Agenda for Change.

A Department of Health spokesperson said: 'It is thanks to the care, quality and dedication of NHS staff we are beginning to deliver a safer seven day NHS for patients. And in line with the rest of the public sector, we are pleased to announce that all NHS staff will receive a 1% pay increase next year.

'The government has made clear that pay restraint in the public sector continues to be a crucial part of its plans to reduce the deficit. It is because of a strong economy that we are able to invest an additional £10 billion a year by 2020 to support the NHS’ own plan for the future.'

The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) however, says that while it is encouraging that the government has accepted the recommendations the pay uplift will do very little to benefit nurses who have already experienced years of pay restraint.

'As nursing pay has fallen behind by at least 14% in real terms, this decision will do nothing to relieve ongoing issues of staff shortages,' says chief executive Janet Davies.

'Nurses have been telling the government that they are struggling to make ends meet, and are asking themselves if they can afford to continue nursing. Their warnings have repeatedly fallen on deaf ears. The earnings of the people who are looking after us and keeping our health service going have fallen way behind everyone else. Worse, they have fallen way behind inflation.'

Unite has also expressed its disappointment saying that this is 'no way to run the NHS' and says that reduced pay is the reason many are leaving the NHS. 'It is small wonder that the NHS staff are leaving the health service for better pay and work/life balance either in the private sector or abroad. As a consequence, billions of pounds are being spent on agency staff to plug the gaps,' said Unite assistant general secretary for public services, Gail Cartmail.

The Pay Review Body also recommended that the Department of Health took into account the removal of the student nurse bursary and to monitor the number of nurses that are entering the workforce after its removal.

Previously the government has rejected a 1% pay rise leading to strikes and industrial action from nurses. The announcement comes just before the Chancellor George Osborne lays out his next budget on 16 March.

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Comments

The 1%pay increase for Nurses and AHPs is a complete disgrace and it's time hospital staff and NHS users should step up and voice their concerns for fair pay for the hard working and underpaid NHS staff.
I for one have always been against the prospect of striking but I feel it is the only available option for a fair pay review for the hard working staff in the NHS.
Posted by: ,
Why don't the MP's take a pay freeze for four years and then give themselves a pay rise of 1%. Lead by example I say. If they are not prepared to do it, then don't expect others to.
Posted by: ,
Junior doctors offerd 10% and are striking.
We accept 1 % its a joke . There is a shortage of nurses which will only get worse.
I cant wait to retire
Posted by: ,
Junior doctors offerd 10% and are striking.
We accept 1 % its a joke . There is a shortage of nurses which will only get worse.
I cant wait to retire
Posted by: ,
Considering that money was found to increase the hospital doctorss' salary in addition to quarter of a million spent on their training, it is scandulous that the £6000.nurses training bursary has been removed.
I believe one needs to have the commitment to give good care and nurturing to others but this cannot be done without the ability to support oneself whilst training. Subsidised nursing accommodation no longer exists and most potential nursing trainees are unable to pay the high rent demanded by private landlords. 1% pay increase following years of pay freeze of nurses pay will not certainly attract caring nurses to the profession. Nurse training needs to be revised in order to attract the right recruits
Posted by: ,
As I work part time 1% was less than £1 a month last year so I won't expect any more this year.
Posted by: ,
This still is not enough, the government, trusts are spending stupid amounts of money on agency staff-try looking after the people they have already employed. Thank goodness I am nearing the end of my career. I never came in for the money but 43 years on to get a decent yearly pay rise is not much to ask. I was approached by a GP run agency this week who offered me 4 times my salary for out of hours/bank holidays-crazy.!
Posted by: ,
Too little too late
Posted by: ,
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