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TB rates are decreasing in England

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TB rates continue to decrease in England TB rates continue to decrease in England

Rates of Tuberculosis (TB) in England have decreased since 2013, stated new figures from Public Health England (PHE).

PHE's annual TB report showed that the number of cases has dropped from 7257 cases in 2013 to 6520 cases in 2014.

As in previous years, London accounted for the highest proportion of cases in England with 2572 cases of TB in 2014 down from 2965 cases in 2013.

The reductions are mainly due to a reduction in cases in the non-UK born population, which make up nearly three-quarters of all TB cases in England. There hasn't been a similar reduction in the rate of TB in those born in the UK.

Iin January 2015 PHE and NHS England implemented a collaborative TB strategy, which included the key actions to achieve a year on year reduction in all aspects of TB in England and a reduction in the inequalities associated with the disease.

Professor Paul Cosford, director for health protection and medical director for PHE, said: 'This is the third year in a row that we have seen a reduction in the number of TB cases in England, which is excellent news. This decrease is likely due to a number of factors, including changes in migration patterns, and the impact of pre-entry screening, in addition to interventions to improve the control of TB, both in England and abroad.

'TB remains one of the key priorities for PHE, and we are working with key partners to oversee the development of a stronger national apporach to TB control.'

Dr Lucy Thomas, head of TB surveillance for PHE, said: 'The recent decrease in TB cases is very welcome, although TB rates in England still remain among the highest in Western Europe. To achieve further reductions in TB in England we will build upon existing achievements through the sustained and co-ordinated action of all key stakeholders, as set out in the collaborative TB strategy.'


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