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Ukrainian children brought to England for cancer treatment

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Ukrainian children brought to England for cancer t ‘The situation in Ukraine is deeply shocking and saddening, and the NHS will continue to help in any way we can,' says NHS England chief executive Amanda Pritchard

The NHS is providing care to 21 Ukrainian children who have been brought to England to escape the Russian invasion of the eastern European country.

The children and their immediate family members landed in England from Poland and have been triaged by clinicians to understand their health needs before being sent to NHS hospitals in England to continue their care.

‘I am appalled by the atrocities we’ve seen in Ukraine and the despicable attacks being carried out on innocent civilians,’ said Health and Social Care Secretary Sajid Javid.

Read more: International Council of Nurses condemns ‘profoundly shocking’ Russian attack on children’s hospital

‘I am proud that the UK is offering lifesaving medical care to these Ukrainian children, who have been forced out of their home country by the Russian invasion while undergoing medical treatment. I know that the incredible staff in the NHS will ensure they get the best possible care. I am hugely grateful to our partners and our Polish friends for their support in bringing these children to the UK.’

Hospitals in Poland have taken in many children needing healthcare who have arrived from Ukraine. With more children crossing the border requiring immediate treatment, the UK has responded to Poland’s call for support from international partners to provide additional care.

The UK partnered with St Jude Children’s Research Hospital, a non-profit American organisation which specialises in paediatric diseases, to arrange an urgent flight for the children.

‘The situation in Ukraine is deeply shocking and saddening, and the NHS will continue to help in any way we can, whether that is by working with government to provide medical supplies directly to Ukraine, or in this instance, by making sure these children with life-threatening cancers get the crucial treatment they need,’ said NHS England chief executive Amanda Pritchard.

Read more: Two-fifths of pancreatic cancer patients not prescribed recommended medication

‘It is fantastic that colleagues at paediatric hospitals around the country have gone above and beyond to help these children during their greatest hour of need and I would like to thank the NHS staff, volunteers, charities and other partners involved who have come together to make this happen at breakneck speed.’

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